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Chris Whitty warns of rise in young with long Covid, as UK sees 28,800 cases in a day

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Chris Whitty warns of rise in young with long Covid, as UK sees 28,800 cases in a day

Long Covid will increase in the UK, particularly among the young, unless infection rates are kept down, the government’s chief medical adviser has warned.

Chris Whitty urged the nation to “push hell for leather” to make sure everyone is vaccinated as he predicted a difficult winter ahead.

“The deaths from Covid I think are mercifully going to be much lower in this wave compared to the previous ones as a proportion of cases – but long Covid remains, I think, a worry,” he told a conference organised by the Local Government Association.

He made his comments after the British government said it will scrap the need for face coverings and social distancing from 19 July, while admitting the pandemic was “very far from the end”.

The new health secretary Sajid Javid also announced that those who have receive both doses of the vaccine will not have to self-isolate if they are a close contact of a new positive case of Covid from 16 August.

However a World Health Organization (WHO) expert has warned that the rush to lift coronavirus restrictions is “very premature”. Dr Mike Ryan, the executive director of the WHO’s health emergencies programme, added: “I think we’re going to pay a price for that.”

Covid cases could surge to 200,000 a day even as England abolishes most of the remaining coronavirus restrictions, according to Professor Neil Ferguson, from Imperial College London and a member of the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (Sage).

Key Points

  • Chris Whitty warns of rise in young with long Covid
  • WHO expert says rush to lift restrictions ‘very premature’
  • PM says rules on masks and social distancing set to be torn up
  • Former health secretary suggests lockdown easing not irreversible
  • Tory MP says she won’t wear mask on public transport
  • Covid cases could hit 200,000 a day, warns Sage scientist
  • Fully vaccinated people will no longer have to self-isolate from 16 August

US to send Covid vaccines to Guatemala and Vietnam

20:07 , Celine Wadhera

The Biden administration will send coronavirus vaccines to Guatemala and Vietnam, the White House press secretary announced on Tuesday.

Jen Psaki said: “Both Guatemala and Vietnam will be receiving Covid vaccine doses from the Biden-Harris Administration.”

Guatemala is expected to receive 1.5 million vaccines, while Vietnam is expected to receive 2 million vaccines. Both countries will receive the vaccine manufactured by Moderna.

The US government previously committed to sharing at least 80 million doses of the vaccine with countries around the world.

Brazil approves new clinical trial of Covid-19 vaccine candidate

19:49 , Celine Wadhera

Brazil has approved a new clinical trial of a Covid-19 vaccine candidate, the country’s health regulator Anvisa announced on Tuesday.

The jab will be a “next generation” vaccine that uses mRNA technology, and will be tested by Sanofi Pasteur, the vaccination division of French pharmaceutical giant Sanofi.

The clinical trial will be phase one and two, and around 150 volunteers in Brazil will be involved in the study, Anvisa said.

Participants will receive two doses of the vaccine candidate, 21 days apart.

The same trial is also expected to take place in the US, Honduras and Australia.

Reuters

19:28 , Celine Wadhera

In a tweet, the Scottish first minister said that reported Covid cases had dropped “compared to this time last week” and shared the latest daily coronavirus figures for the country.

The statistics included 2,363 new infections, bringing Scotland’s total cases throughout the pandemic to 299,848.

An additional seven deaths were also reported, bringing the country’s death toll to 7,735.

Nicola Sturgeon tweeted: “Daily fluctuations still likely – but reported Scottish cases have dropped compared to this time last week. Vital that everyone gets vaccine – & that we all stay outdoors as much as possible and continue to follow advice on distancing, face masks, hygiene etc”

US President launches new campaign to encourage Americans to get vaccinated

19:15 , Celine Wadhera

American president Joe Biden is launching a new educational campaign to encourage Americans to get vaccinated, as vaccination rates have fallen across the US and the Delta variant threatens to cause new outbreaks across the country.

The White House press secretary, Jen Psaki, said that the new campaign would include “targeted, community-by-community, door-to-door outreach to get remaining Americans vaccinated by ensuring they have the information they need about how safe and accessible the vaccine is”.

My colleague John Bowden reports.



© Provided by The Independent

Biden goes door-to-door to boost shots as Delta variant sweeps US

General secretary of University and College Union criticises government’s reopening

19:02 , Celine Wadhera

The general secretary of the University and College Union criticized the government’s plan to lift “health and safety measures in education while cases are climbing rapidly”.

Dr Jo Grady said: “The shocking outbreaks we have seen in colleges and universities over the past academic year show that educational settings act as Covid incubators and help the virus spread rapidly.

“Worryingly, it appears the government has learned nothing, and is set to repeat the same mistakes, abandoning important safety measures too early and showing a continued reckless disregard for health and safety.

“Last year, ministers in Westminster failed to listen to staff and students when they pushed ahead with an unsafe reopening of college and university campuses for in-person teaching.”

“This cannot be allowed to happen again, and vaccines need to be made available to all students as quickly as possible.”

Last month, universities across the country called on the Government to set up vaccination centres on university campuses to ensure students are fully vaccinated at the start of the autumn term.

Restrictions on face-to-face teaching in universities to end in English universities

18:43 , Celine Wadhera

Restrictions on face-to-face teaching in English universities are set to be lifted later this month, as the government continues to lift coronavirus restrictions.

Education secretary Gavin Williamson told MPs today that “there will be no restrictions on in-person teaching and learning in universities unless students are advised to isolate or impacted by local outbreaks”.

His announcement comes after many universities said that they had planned to adopt a blended approach for classes in the autumn term, mixing in-person and online teaching.

A Universities UK spokeswoman said: “Following the prime minister’s announcement and the statement by the education secretary, universities are awaiting publication of updated guidance for higher education and will review this as part of making decisions for the period after restrictions end and planning of the autumn term

She added that the health and wellbeing of staff, students and local communities was Universities UK’s main priority.

Lambda variant map: total worldwide cases of Covid strain first discovered in Peru

18:25 , Celine Wadhera

The Lambda variant that was first detected in Peru in December 2020 and is now the dominant strain of Covid-19 in South America.

It has since been discovered in 26 countries around the world, including the UK.

The variant is concerning to scientists for its “potential increased transmissibility or possible increased resistance to neutralising antibodies,” suggesting that it could spread faster than other variants or prove resistant to vaccines.

My colleague Joe Sommerlad has more, including a map of where the variant has been detected.



map


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Lambda variant map: Where in the world has the new strain been found?

Hospital ‘reaches capacity’ amid rise in cases

17:53 , Peter Stubley

A hospital in Scotland has cancelled all non-elective surgery amid an increase in Covid cases.

NHS Highland said that Raigmore Hospital in Inverness has reached capacity and has been placed at “code black status”.

A large number of staff are having to self-isolate which is placing pressure on staffing levels.

NHS Highland said: “The impact of this at Raigmore Hospital, in particular, has been significant over the past few days. We have reached capacity in the hospital, we have long waits in our Emergency Department and we know people requiring urgent care will still need to come in for treatment. As a result, the hospital is currently at code black status.

“The impact on services is also being experienced across our community teams both in Highland and Argyll and Bute.

“Urgent work is taking place to ensure we can treat our patients appropriately and compassionately.

“Medical, surgical and clinical support teams are meeting regularly to agree the actions that must be taken and discuss what more can be done to reduce the pressure on services within the hospital.”

Top 10 areas for Covid infections

17:47 , Peter Stubley

Dundee has the highest weekly rate of new cases in the UK, at 881 per 100,000 population, according to the government’s Covid dashboard.

Tamworth in Staffordshire is second, with a rate of 734, while Newcastle, South Tyneside and Gateshead remain in the top 10.

The figures cover the seven day period ending 1 July.

  1. Dundee City 881.3
  2. Tamworth 734.1
  3. Midlothian 719.2
  4. Newcastle upon Tyne 712
  5. South Tyneside 690.2
  6. Gateshead 629.5
  7. Oxford 629
  8. Rossendale 621.1
  9. East Lothian 608.8
  10. North East Lincolnshire 607.9

Lord Bethell under investigation over pass for Hancock’s aide

17:33 , Peter Stubley

Health minister Lord Bethell is formally under investigation over a complaint that he sponsored a parliamentary pass for the aide Matt Hancock was caught kissing on leaked CCTV.

The Lords Commissioner for Standards confirmed on Tuesday that the Tory peer was being investigated over his “use of facilities” in relation to Gina Coladangelo.

Mr Hancock’s embrace with the former adviser ultimately cost him his government job after it was revealed the pair breached coronavirus guidance.

The long-term friend of Mr Hancock was brought into the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) first as an unpaid adviser before getting the £15,000-a-year director role in September.

Members of the House of Lords can sponsor passes for secretaries and research assistants if they “genuinely and personally” fulfil those roles for the sponsoring member.

The sponsor has to sign a declaration to that effect, and it would be against the rules if the individual did not work for the peer.

A House of Lords spokesman said: “The Commissioner for Standards is investigating a complaint regarding Lord Bethell sponsoring a pass for Gina Coladangelo.”

Press Association

Bank of England staff to return to office for one day a week

17:25 , Peter Stubley

The Bank of England will ask its workers to return to the office for one day per week from September.

Most of the Bank’s staff have worked from home since the first coronavirus lockdown in March 2020, with only 5 per cent going into the office because their roles demanded it.

Government recommendations to work from home if possible will lift on 19 July along with the rest of England’s coronavirus lockdown rules.



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Bank of England workers to return to office for one day per week

Hospital admissions: Are we headed for trouble?

17:10 , Peter Stubley

The latest hospital data for the UK reveals that there were 2,140 Covid patients in hospital (as of 4 July).

This is up by 35 per cent from the previous week, and is the highest figure since 15 April.

There are 369 patients on ventilation, as of 5 July.

It is comparable to the situation in late September last year, when there were 2,000 patients in hospital and 300+ patients on ventilators.

However at that time the UK was reporting around 6,000 new cases a day, compared to the 27,000+ cases a day being reported at the moment.

Even so, the Health Service Journal reporting that rate of increase in Covid patients in England is the highest since October.

“I think we are in real trouble”, says Alastair McLellan.

Why should you wear a face mask after ‘freedom day’?

16:36 , Peter Stubley

The government’s decision to scrap the requirement to wear masks in shops and on public transport has been widely criticised, with polls revealing most British adults favour keeping the rules after 19 July.

Here’s an in-depth guide to the hot topic of face coverings, including the scientific basis for wearing them during a pandemic.



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How much extra protection do masks give from viruses?

Vaccine update: Jabs total rises to 79.3 million

16:23 , Peter Stubley

A further 77,000 people received their first Covid vaccine dose yesterday, with nearly 148,000 receiving a second dose.

It brings the total number of “double-jabbed” adults in the UK to 33.8 million – or 64.3 per cent of the adult UK population.

Covid daily update: 37 deaths, 28,773 cases

16:15 , Peter Stubley

A further 37 deaths and 28,773 cases have been reported in the UK, according to the latest daily figures.

It is the highest number of deaths since 23 April and the highest number of cases since 29 January.

We need to go ‘hell for leather’ to prevent more long Covid, says Whitty

16:10 , Rory Sullivan

England’s chief medical officer has said a large increase in the number of long Covid sufferers needs to be prevented by going “hell for leather” with the vaccine rollout and infection prevention methods.

Addressing the Local Government Association’s Annual Conference, Professor Chris Whitty said: “Since there’s a lot of Covid at the moment and the rates are going up I regret to say I think we will get a significant amount more long Covid, particularly in the younger ages where the vaccination rates are currently much lower.

“Fundamentally the two ways to prevent long Covid in my view are to keep Covid rates right down and make sure everyone is vaccinated so they get very mild disease and I think we really just need to push hell for leather for those two.

“The deaths from Covid I think are mercifully going to be much lower in this wave compared to the previous ones as a proportion of cases but long Covid remains, I think, a worry.

“We don’t know how big an issue it’s going to be but I think we should assume it’s not going to be trivial.”

WHO expert says rush to lift restrictions ‘very premature’

15:54 , Rory Sullivan

Dr Mike Ryan, the executive director of the World Health Organisation’s health emergencies programme, has urged world leaders not to rush into lifting Covid-19 restrictions.

“We’ve made a very premature rush back to full normality and I think we’re going to pay a price for that,” he said.

Ella Glover reports:



a woman taking a selfie


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‘Very premature’: WHO expert warns over early rush to end restrictions

Weddings: Has the pandemic changed them forever?

15:50 , Rory Sullivan

Weddings have been one of the hardest-hit sectors during the pandemic.

But have the last 15 months altered the industry forever?

Join Emma Henderson, The Independent’s IndyBest editor, and a panel of experts to hear about the future of the wedding trade.

The event will be held over Zoom on 14 July from 6.30-7.30pm.



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The future of weddings to be discussed in live virtual expert panel

Government needs to offer ‘clarity’ on how to stop spiralling infections, says Labour

15:35 , Rory Sullivan

Labour has criticised education secretary Gavin Williamson for offering “no clarity on how the government will stop infections spiralling”.

This came after Mr Williamson gave a Commons statement in which he announced that the school “bubble” system will be scrapped from 19 July to prevent further educational disruption.

His opposite number, Kate Green, said: “Just over an hour ago the DfE confirmed that last week 623,000 pupils were not in school because of coronavirus, and while 471,000 of those pupils were out of class because of a bubble collapsing, there was still over 150,000 who were not in the classroom with confirmed or suspected cases of coronavirus or because of potential contact with a case outside the classroom.

“It’s not just bubbles that have driven pupils from the classroom, it’s the Conservatives’ negligence in letting the Delta variant take hold at the same time as they failed to support schools with the necessary precautions.”

Scotland to have ‘fundamentally’ different Covid restrictions to England

15:15 , Rory Sullivan

From 19 July, Scotland will have extremely different coronavirus restrictions to England, a Scottish minister has confirmed.

Finance secretary Kate Forbes said there will be “fundamental difference” in the countries’ approaches, with mask wearing likely to extend into the summer north of the border.

Social distancing and the need for masks will be scrapped in England from mid-July, while the next easing of “major” legal restrictions in Scotland will take place on 9 August.

The minister said: “There are some similarities but there are two fundamental differences with Boris Johnson’s announcement yesterday.

“The first is, on the timetable itself: we have said that all of Scotland will move to Level 0 on July 19, so that includes the easing of physical distancing indoors and outdoors, and then we’ll move beyond Level Zero from August 9.

“But we do think that there will still be some baseline measures – for example the wearing of face masks – which will continue for a longer period of time because we all know the virus is still with us and it is still infectious.”

Huge rise in school Covid absences

15:00 , Rory Sullivan

School absences relating to the coronavirus hit record numbers last week, with 640,000 pupils unable to attend classes.

Of these children, 561,000 were self-isolating after possible contact with a Covid-19 incfection, while 34,000 had a suspect case and 28,000 had a confirmed case of the disease.

More than 18,000 students were also off school because their schools had temporarily closed.



a group of people sitting at a park


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Huge rise in pupils not in school last week as Covid-related absences hit 640,000

Businesses can encourage workers to return to office, government says

14:45 , Rory Sullivan

Businesses have the government’s support in encouraging workers to go back to the office, the housing secretary has said.

The day after the prime minister said the remaining lockdown restrictions would be lifted from 19 July, Robert Jenrick noted that it would be better for towns and city centres if people went back to work.

“So businesses have the support of a strong government message now if they want to encourage their staff to return to the office,” he added.

More UK deaths registered in 2020 that in any year since First World War

14:30 , Rory Sullivan

A total of 689,629 deaths were registered in the UK in 2020, more than any year since the First World War, the Office for National Statistics has said.

This means that for the first time in almost 50 years there were more deaths than births, which stood at 683,191 last year.

The last time deaths outweighed births in this country was in 1976.

What is the Epsilon variant?

14:15 , Rory Sullivan

The Epsilon variant of coronavirus– also known as B.1.429 – was first discovered late last year in California.

Soon afterweards, the US’ Centers for Disease Prevention and Control (CDC) designated it as a variant of concern.

Early research suggested that it was 20 per cent more transmissible than previous strains of the virus.

Tim Wyatt has more:



a close up of a flower


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What is the Epsilon variant and can it escape the vaccines?

School bubbles to be lifted, Williamson says

14:00 , Rory Sullivan

The use of “bubbles” at schools will no longer be required from 19 July, Gavin Williamson has confirmed.

Under this system, all pupils in a particular bubble – which could be as large as an entire year group – need to self-isolate if one member of the group tests positive for Covid-19.

Speaking in the Commons on Tuesday afternoon, the education minister Gavin Williamson said: “Though keeping children in consistent groups was essential to control the spread of the virus when our population was less vaccinated, we recognize that the system of bubbles and isolation is causing disruption to many children’s education.”

“That is why we’ll be ending bubbles and transferring contact tracing to NHS test and trace system for early years settings, schools and colleges.”



Gavin Williamson wearing a suit and tie


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School bubbles to end and in-house teaching to remain at universities, Gavin Williamson confirms

Russia reports record number of daily Covid deaths

13:43 , Rory Sullivan

Russia reported a record 737 daily coronavirus deaths on Tuesday, raising the national death toll to 139,316.

The country also confirmed 23,378 new infections, more than a fifth of which occurred in Moscow.

The federal statistics agency believes many more people have died from Covid-19 than the Kremlin’s figure. It estimates that roughly 270,000 people in the country have lost their lives because of the disease.

Exclusive: Long Covid campaigners urge Javid to reconsider time of restriction easing

13:26 , Rory Sullivan

Sajid Javid should “reconsider” lifting all coronavirus restrictions later this month, Long Covid campaigners have said.

The advocacy group LongCovidSOS has written to the health secretary, saying the government has been treating the condition as “an afterthought”.

The letter said the latest decision will condemn “thousands of predominantly young, active people … to prolonged ill-health and disability every day”.

It added that there “may not be a perfect time to lift all restrictions, but the time is certainly not now”.

Samuel Lovett has this exclusive:



a man standing in front of a building


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Long Covid campaigners urge Sajid Javid to ‘reconsider’ timing of restriction lifting

Labour criticises government over lack of financial incentive for those self-isolating

13:17 , Rory Sullivan

The shadow health secretary Jonathan Ashworth has criticised the government for failing to provide a financial incentive for those who are self-isolating and have to miss work.

The Labour MP made the comments after Sajid Javid announced further easing of coronavirus restrictions.

In response to his counterpart’s announcement, Mr Ashworth said: “Now he has justified allowing infections to climb by pointing to the weakened link between hospitalisations and deaths and that we are building a protective wall. But of course, the wall is only half-built and we know from outbreaks in Israel and research that the Delta variant can be transmitted through fully vaccinated people even if they don’t get it.”

He added: “Now, I understand the rationale for his announcement today, but I’ve got to tell him again that the biggest barrier to an effective isolation policy hasn’t been the inconvenience but the lack of financial incentive to stay at home. And if we are going to live with this virus the days of people soldiering on when unwell are over, sick pay is vital to infection control, would he (Mr Javid) please now fix it?”

Government will let England’s pubs stay open to 11.15pm in case of penalties in Euro 2020 final

12:56 , Tim Wyatt

The government is set to tweak the law to let pubs across England stay open until 11:15pm on Sunday night – in case the Euros final goes to extra time and penalties.

Downing Street confirmed that the government would put forward an emergency change in the law so pubs can stay open late for the special occasion.

Adam Forrest reports:



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England’s pubs can stay open until 11.15pm if Euros final goes penalties

Fully vaccinated people will no longer have to self-isolate from 16 August

12:49 , Tim Wyatt

Sajid Javid, the new health secretary, has told the House of Commons those who have received both doses of the vaccine will not have to self-isolate if they are a close contact of a new positive case of Covid from next month.

At present, if you are told by NHS Test and Trace you are a close contact of someone who has tested positive for Covid you must enter 10 days of self-isolation, even if you have had both your jabs.

But from 16 August, Mr Javid announced, the rules will change so that those who are fully vaccinated can continue their lives as normal even if they are logged as a close contact.

Similarly, the rules will also be relaxed on the same date for those under the age of 18, who have not yet been offered the vaccine. They too will be freed from needing to self-isolate.

Instead, both the vaccinated and under-18s will be encouraged to get a Covid test.

Read more here.

Indonesia grapples with worst wave of Covid so far

12:44 , Tim Wyatt

Health officials in Indonesia are wrestling to bring under control the country’s worst outbreak of coronavirus yet, with 31,189 new cases and 728 deaths recorded on Tuesday.

Southeast Asia’s most populous country has seen record daily infections numbers in 11 of the last 16 days as the highly transmissible Delta variant rips through the nation.

Hospitals have become overstretched, with problems securing enough oxygen supply, and some patients have been unable to receive medical attention because of limited resources.

However, backup medical facilities are being prepared for a worst-case scenario where daily coronavirus infections reach 40,000 to 50,000, an official said on Tuesday.

Just 1.6% of Indonesia’s more than 270 million population have been fully vaccinated against COVID-19.

Japan to ship millions of Covid vaccines to Taiwan

12:00 , Rory Sullivan

Japan will ship more than a million doses of the AstraZeneca vaccine to Taiwan this week, the government has announced.

Tokyo will send 1.13 million shots to the island on Thursday, foreign minister Toshimitsu Motegi confirmed.

This follows a donation of 1.24 million doses to Taiwan last month. Japan will also send a million spare vaccines to each of Thailand, the Philippines and Vietnam.

Responding to news of the gift, Taiwanese premier Su Tseng-chang wrote: “True friends always lend a hand when they need each other the most.”

Sage warns that ‘freedom’ from Covid restrictions could only last weeks

11:40 , Rory Sullivan

Spiralling numbers of coronavirus cases could mean restrictive measures need to be reintroduced in a matter of weeks and will be “required for much longer”, government scientists have warned.

This comes after the government announced yesterday that face coverings and social distancing would be ditched from 19 July.



Boris Johnson wearing a suit and tie


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Fears of Autumn restrictions as Sage warns ‘freedom’ could only last weeks

Video: Javid says he’ll cary mask for ‘foreseeable future’

11:25 , Rory Sullivan

No ‘freedom day’ for clinically vulnerable, charities warn

11:15 , Rory Sullivan

The government has been warned that lifting mandatory mask wearing will have a negative effect on those most at risk from coronavirus.

Gemma Peters, chief executive of Blood Cancer UK, said those with blood cancer would feel less safe after the removal of social distancing and mask wearing.

“This means that for many of them, July 19 will not be freedom day in England but the day more freedoms are taken away from them,” she said.



a man standing in front of a window


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No ‘freedom day’ for vulnerable without masks, warn health charities

Care home Covid deaths at pandemic low

11:00 , Rory Sullivan

The weekly number of Covid-19 deaths among care home residents has reached its lowest point since the start of the pandemic.

In England and Wales, there were 10 coronavirus-related deaths in this demographic in the week to 25 June.

New health minister will carry mask for ‘foreseeable future’

10:55 , Rory Sullivan

The new health minister Sajid Javid has said he will carry a face mask around with him for the “foreseeable future”.

Ahead of the easing of more Covid-19 restrictions on 19 July, told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme on Tuesday: “For the foreseeable future I’ll be carrying a face mask with me, I think that’s a very responsible thing for anyone to do, as I’ve said the pandemic is not over.”

This approach differs from some of his Conservatives colleagues, including Miriam Coates who said she would not wear a face covering on public transport because “showing our faces is part of being human”.

Ashley Cowburn has the story:



a man wearing a suit and tie talking on a cell phone


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Sajid Javid says he’ll carry a face mask with him for ‘foreseeable future’ as it’s ‘responsible thing to do’

Second man charged with assaulting Chris Whitty

10:40 , Rory Sullivan

A second man has been charged with assaulting England’s chief medical officer Chris Whitty in London last month.

Jonathan Chew, 24, will appear at Westminster Magistrates’ Court on Tuesday, the Met Police said.

This comes after Lewis Hughes, 23, was charged with the same crime, after videos of the incident were posted online.

Read more here:



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Second man charged with assault after Chris Whitty park incident

UK businesses call for clarity after lockdown announcement

10:25 , Rory Sullivan

Business leaders urgently need more clarity about the easing of lockdown, industry groups have said.

While social distancing rules will be scrapped from 19 July, it remains unclear how self-isolation and testing will work in the future.

Shevaun Haviland, the director-general of the British Chamber of Commerce, said: “Businesses in England still do not have the full picture they desperately need to plan for unlocking. Firms do not  yet know  the future of self-isolation rules, if testing will remain free for them, or when international travel will open up effectively.”

Jon Sharman reports:



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UK businesses need more clarity after Covid lockdown announcement, say industry groups

ONS releases latest Covid death toll

10:10 , Rory Sullivan

There have been 153,926 deaths involving coronavirus in the UK, the Office for National Statistics (ONS) has said.

All of these fatalities mention Covid-19 on the death certifcate.

The most deaths in a single day was the 1,481 recorded on 19 Janaury, slightly more than the 1,461 which occurred on 8 April last year.

Video: Health minister warns Covid cases could reach 100,000 a day

10:00 , Rory Sullivan

Working adults in England’s poorest areas four times more likely to die from Covid

09:50 , Rory Sullivan

The coronavirus mortality rate is 3.7-times higher for under-65s living in the most deprived communities, a new study has found.

The Health Foundation, which conducted the research, said the “unequal burdens” of the pandemic have been “carried by different population groups and regions”.

It also found that six in every 10 people who died with the disease between January and November 2020 were disabled.

Our science correspondent Samuel Lovett has more details:



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Working adults in England’s poorest areas ‘four times more likely to die from Covid’

Indonesia, Fiji and Bangladesh prepare for fresh onslaught of Covid cases

09:41 , Rory Sullivan

While talk in the UK centres on easing Covid restrictions, in many parts of the world infections rates are rising.

Indonesia has prepared backup health facilities for a worst-case scenario where daily infections reach 40,000 to 50,000.

Bangladesh extended its strictest lockdown to July 14 to combat a surge in coronavirus cases led by the highly contagious Delta variant.

Fiji’s Covid hospital mortuary is now full and the Delta variant is fuelling record levels of infections.

How do you feel about restrictions ending? Tell us in our commenting poll

09:31 , Tom Batchelor

How do you feel about the final stage of lockdown taking place?

Do you feel relieved that the end of the roadmap is in sight or do you think the government is taking this step too soon?

We want to know what you think about 19 July being the date restrictions come to end.

Submit your thoughts in the comments section of the story below:



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Poll: Are you ready for lockdown restrictions to end on 19 July?

We can’t think only about Covid, says health secretary

09:25 , Tom Batchelor

The world can no longer think only about Covid-19 and ignore the other critical health issues, economic problems and education challenges that have build up during the pandemic, Sajid Javid has said.

“We can’t live in a world where the only thing that we are thinking about is Covid – and not about all the other health problems, our economic problems, our education challenges and we have to make use of a vaccine that is thankfully working,” he told Sky News.

“When I came into this department with a fresh set of eyes – it is shocking when you look at all the other health problems that have built up: Some 7 million people have not come forward during the pandemic for help from the NHS with their health problems.”

Chris Whitty on the three times we should still wear a mask after 19 July

09:19 , Tom Batchelor

Professor Chris Whitty has laid out the three circumstances in which he will continue to wear a mask after 19 July: in crowded indoor spaces; if required to do so by “any competent authority”; and when doing so will make others feel more comfortable.

Here is the government chief medical adviser’s full guidance:



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Chris Whitty on the three times we should still wear a mask after July 19

Easing rules will ‘make conditions for virus transmission more favourable’ – former chief scientific adviser

09:12 , Tom Batchelor

The government’s former chief scientific adviser has said the lifting of Covid restrictions will make it “even more favourable” for the virus.

Professor Sir Mark Walport told Sky News: “I don’t think anyone would have imagined taking off all restrictions at a time when there are 25,000 infections a day, doubling about every nine days.

“The reason it’s become possible for ministers to make this decision is because the vaccine programme has become so very successful and has weakened, but certainly not broken, the link between infection and the most serious consequences of disease.

“As the prime minister says, by 19 July it’s quite likely there’ll be 50,000 cases a day and when we do take off the restrictions it will make the conditions for transmission of the virus even more favourable for the virus.

“I think there is a very high priority to keep the vaccines up, and I think the other thing is the guidance needs to be very clear for people.”

School bubbles set to be dropped in lockdown lifting

09:06 , Tom Batchelor

Schools “bubbles” are set to be scrapped as Covid measures are eased across England from 19 July.

The measure keeps pupils and teachers in groups to minimise mixing and help limit the spread of coronavirus.

Concerns have been raised in recent weeks about the interpretation of rules which have resulted in large groups of pupils being sent home for 10 days if another pupil in their bubble tests positive for Covid-19.

At 1.30pm today the education secretary, Gavin Williamson, will update the Commons on easing restrictions in schools.

Read the full report here:



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School bubbles set to be dropped in lockdown lifting

Bereaved families dismayed at ‘gut-churning’ Johnson announcement

08:59 , Tom Batchelor

Families who lost their loved ones to Covid-19 have said Boris Johnson’s plans to scrap social distancing and mask-wearing rules from later this month were “gut-churning”.

The Covid-19 Bereaved Families for Justice group accused the government of having “skewed priorities” and said it was “an error to act like we’ve got Covid beaten”.

Here is the story:



a woman talking on a cell phone


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Bereaved families dismayed at ‘gut-churning’ Johnson announcement

Covid easing ‘calculated risk’, says health expert

08:51 , Tom Batchelor

Calum Semple, a member of the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (Sage) has said the lifting of coronavirus restrictions is a “calculated risk”.

The professor of child health and outbreak medicine at the University of Liverpool, speaking in a personal capacity, told Times Radio: “I wouldn’t say this is a gamble, it’s more of a calculated risk.”

He added that there was “no reason” why businesses should not be able to refuse to serve customers without face masks after July 19.

“They can’t mandate it, but neither are businesses mandated to have to serve you, so if you run a nail bar and you want the clients to wear a face mask, you simply say ‘You have to wear a face mask if you want to get your nails done’.

“That’s a good example of some direct, personal, face-to-face contact for a good 40 minutes where you don’t want your staff breathing in what Joe Public is breathing on to you.

“There’s no reason why many businesses can’t actually just say ‘Hang on a minute, in this setting we want you to wear a face mask’.

“I don’t see why public transport companies couldn’t make the same assessment.”

Sajid Javid warns Covid cases could hit 100,000 a day as restrictions scrapped

08:45 , Tom Batchelor

Sajid Javid has warned that Covid cases could get as high as 100,000 cases a day this summer, as he suggested numbers will “rise significantly” after all remaining Covid restrictions are eased in a fortnight.

Speaking on BBC Radio 4’s Today programme, the new health secretary described the situation as “unchartered territory”, but also stressed link between cases, hospitalisations and deaths had been “severely weakened”.

Here is the full story:



a close up of a sign


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Sajid Javid warns Covid cases could hit 100,000 a day as restrictions scrapped

Which restrictions are set to end on 19 July?

08:36 , Tom Batchelor

All regulations on social distancing and mask wearing are set to be lifted on 19 July, although there will be guidance on mask-wearing in confined places, the government announced on Monday.

The requirement to work from home where possible will also end, but employers are encouraged to consult with their staff about this move.

Local transport authorities and airlines will be able to set mask-wearing as a condition for travel, but there will be no law requiring masks to be worn.

Here is the full list of changes:



Boris Johnson wearing a suit and tie


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Lockdown UK: What is ‘freedom day’ and which restrictions will end on 19 July?

Ministers shouldn’t rule out reimposing Covid restrictions if cases hit 200,000 a day, warns Sage scientist

08:29 , Tom Batchelor

Professor Neil Ferguson, from Imperial College London and a member of the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (Sage), which advises the government, has said that “policy will have to remain flexible” after coronavirus restrictions are lifted.

He warned that cases could conceivably hit 150,000-200,000 a day, which he said would “cause some pressure to the health system”.

“This is a slight gamble, it’s a slight experiment at the moment, and I think it’s justifiable and I’m reasonable optimistic, but policy will have to remain flexible,” he told theToday programme.

“If we end up in something close to the worst-case scenario we and other groups are looking at, which I think is unlikely but can’t be ruled out, then yes there will need to be some course direction later.”

Javid to unveil changes to self-isolation rules

08:24 , Tom Batchelor

During his media round on Tuesday morning, Sajid Javid also said he would set out self-isolation changes for those who have had both vaccine doses in Parliament later today.

“We will have a more proportionate system of test, trace and isolate, and it is absolutely right that those that have been double jabbed that we can take a different approach than the one we take today,” he told BBC Breakfast.

“In terms of what we will be doing exactly, you will have to wait for my statement to Parliament later today.”

Sajid Javid: I will wear a mask in enclosed spaces

08:18 , Tom Batchelor

Sajid Javid has said he would continue to wear a face covering in a crowded space or if he was with someone who felt uncomfortable about one not being worn, once restrictions are eased.

The health secretary told Sky News: “For the foreseeable future I will be carrying a face mask with me, I think that’s a very responsible thing for anyone to do.

“As I have said, the pandemic is not over.

“If I’m in a crowded or enclosed space, I will wear a face mask. In fact I will wear one if I was next to someone or near someone that felt uncomfortable with others not wearing face masks.

“And that’s what I mean by personality responsibility.”

Germany to lift UK travel ban

08:13 , Tom Batchelor

A ban on travel from the UK to Germany is to be lifted after Berlin announced Britain was no longer a country of variant concern.

Germany’s public health institute said on Monday that the UK as well as India, Nepal, Portugal and Russia were no longer “areas of variant concern”, reducing travel restrictions for people arriving from those countries.

All five countries had been downgraded to “high incidence areas”, the Robert Koch Institute said, meaning their citizens can now travel to Germany – but must quarantine on arrival for 10 days.

The quarantine period can be shortened to five days if they test negative, and people who are fully vaccinated can avoid quarantine altogether.

Prior to the change in classification, travelers from those countries were banned from entering Germany unless they were residents, in which case they had to quarantine for 14 days on arrival.

Tory MP says she won’t wear mask on public transport

08:00 , Tom Batchelor

A Tory MP has said she will not wear face masks on public transport once the restrictions are eased because showing her face is “part of being human” – despite a warning about the risk of spreading the virus to vulnerable people.

Miriam Cates said while she expects members of the public will continue to wear masks on public transport after the rules are scrapped, she will not.

“I think people will wear face masks on public transport, that is their decision,” she told LBC radio.

But asked if she would do so, the MP replied: “No I wont be. I think freedom is very important, I think showing our faces is part of being human.”

Interviewer Iain Dale tweeted after his show: “I’m rarely surprised by the utter stupidity of some of our MPs, but this one really takes the biscuit.”

Former health secretary suggests lockdown easing not irreversible

07:54 , Tom Batchelor

Jeremy Hunt, the former health secretary, has suggested the government should avoid committing to the “irreversible” easing of Covid restrictions, saying that with new variants and surging infection rates the situation “may sadly yet change”.

The chairman of the Commons Health Select Committee told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme: “At the moment, the projections are that the deaths from Covid will actually be less than some of our worst years for flu.

“When you have that kind of change, I think it’s reasonable to change the social contract to one of co-operation, rather than compulsion.

“But I think we have got to be careful about using the language of irreversibility, because we still have 350,000 new infections every day across the world, there is still room for the vaccine-busting variants that we are all worried about.

“So we have to be on our guard and recognise that things may sadly yet change.”

Boris Johnson says rules on masks and social distancing set to be torn up

07:44 , Tom Batchelor

Boris Johnson has confirmed plans to tear up social distancing and mask rules on 19 July despite forecasts of 50,000 daily coronavirus cases by that date, warning that failure to reopen society now could force England to keep restrictions in place until 2022.

The prime minister said he believed that high vaccination levels will provide a summer “firebreak” to hold numbers of deaths down as the third wave of Covid-19 peaks, but admitted he might have to reimpose curbs in the winter if new jab-resistant variants emerge.

Here is the full story on what was announced yesterday evening:



Boris Johnson wearing a suit and tie


© Provided by The Independent

Boris Johnson says rules on masks and social distancing set to be torn up on 19 July

Japan to ship vaccines to Asian countries

07:12 , Akshita Jain

Japan has said that it will send millions of doses of AstraZeneca’s Covid-19 vaccine to its Asian neighbours this week.

Foreign minister Toshimitsu Motegi said 1.1 million more doses will be sent to Taiwan, after 1.24 million were delivered last month.

He said 1 million doses each will also be sent to Thailand, the Philippines, and Vietnam this week.

18 children die of post-Covid complications in Indian state

07:00 , Akshita Jain

In the Indian state of Rajasthan, 18 children have died in the last two months from post-Covid complications.

17 of these deaths happened due to multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children at JK Lone hospital, which reported 155 such cases, according to Hindustan Times.

According to US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children is a condition where different body parts can become inflamed, including the heart, lungs, kidneys, or gastrointestinal organs.

Tourists throng Indian state after restrictions eased

06:36 , Akshita Jain

Tourists have flocked Himachal Pradesh after the state eased Covid-19 restrictions last month. This comes even as experts have warned of a third wave of the pandemic that could hit India soon.

A state official said that Himachal Pradesh has received 600,000-700,000 tourists since it relaxed restrictions in late June.

Tourists going to Himachal Pradesh no longer need a negative RT-PCR report or an e-pass to enter the state.

India likely to get 7 million doses of Moderna vaccine but indemnity issue poses a hurdle

06:19 , Akshita Jain

India is likely to get 7 million doses of Moderna’s Covid-19 vaccine through the UN-backed COVAX initiative, but it remains unclear when the doses would arrive.

The uncertainty is mostly because the Indian government is yet to decide on giving indemnity to the vaccine maker, The Print quoted officials as saying.

Both Pfizer and Moderna have reportedly demanded indemnity from the Indian government. The Serum Institute of India — which manufactures the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine — also said that all vaccine makers should be granted the same protection.

India increases vaccination pace, but it’s not enough to reach December goal

06:01 , Akshita Jain

India has increased the pace of vaccination in recent days, but it still falls short of the rate required to inoculate the entire adult population by the end of this year.

5.57 million doses were administered daily on average from 21 to 30 June, the highest for any 10-day period since the vaccination drive began in January, according to The Hindu’s data.

However, India needs to administer more than 8 million doses daily to be able to vaccinate all adults by December. The government had earlier said it will be in a position to inoculate 10 million people daily by July to August.

05:14 , Akshita Jain

Good morning, and welcome to The Independent’s coverage of the coronavirus pandemic for Tuesday 6 July, 2021.



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Things to Do in Denver | Food and Restaurants | Westword

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Things to Do in Denver | Food and Restaurants | Westword

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Before the All-Star Game comes to town, you can spend your week eating through can’t-miss events that include a Wednesday night champagne toast, a free concert with food trucks and BOGO boozy drinks in the park, and Italian street-food specials.

Then check out the upcoming events section for three very hot tickets you’ll need to buy ASAP if you want in on the food fun: a July 21 Philly-style hoagie and ice cream pop-up (pre-orders open up Friday, July 9, at 10 a.m.), Marc Vetri’s one-night-only guest stint at Tavernetta on August 2, and Restaurant Olivia’s August 8 Mediterranean wine dinner.

Here’s what’s on the culinary calendar:

Wednesday, July 7

Raise a glass to Local Jones at its first birthday celebration
Local Jones, 249 Columbine Street
This restaurant located inside the Halcyon hotel opened mid-pandemic, but it survived and is now celebrating its first anniversary with a special dinner menu available from 4 to 9 p.m. Items include green chili-and-cheese enchiladas, beet hummus, carrot “osso buco,” Alamosa bass and more. There will also be live music, half-priced bottles of Nicolas Feuillatte wine, and a champagne toast and cake cutting at 8 p.m.
To make a reservation: Book on Resy

Thursday, July 8

Spend an evening enjoying free live music, food and booze in a park
Riverfront Park, 1610 Little Raven Street
The second edition of the Riverfront Park Sessions includes live music from Sturtz, Sarah Slaton & the Great Perhaps and Boot Gun, along with Boulder Beer, Stem Ciders and two food trucks: OG Burgers and Kariacos, which serves Venezuelan street snacks. The fun runs from 4 to 8 p.m. and you can get BOGO drinks from 4 to 5 p.m. If you miss this one, other upcoming Session dates are August 19 and September 16.
For more info: Visit riverfrontparkevents.com

The Best Food and Drink Events in Denver This Week, July 7-13EXPAND

Courtesy of Pho King Rapidos

Friday, July 9

Eat food from our 2021 Best Food Truck pick at a brewery anniversary party
Novel Strand Brewing Company, 305 First Avenue
This brewery’s third-anniversary party lasts all week, from July 7 to 11, but if you’re going to hit it up for one day of celebration, make it Friday, because Pho King Rapidos will be on hand. Novel Strand will also be releasing Green Showers, an unfiltered hoppy beer featuring Amarillo, Huell Melon, Idaho 7 and Mosaic hops, and Falafel Pop, an unfiltered hoppy beer featuring HBC-586, Mosaic and Nelson Sauvin hops.
To see the full anniversary week schedule: Check out the Facebook event page

Saturday, July 10

Go bRUNch Running at a Miles and Mimosas pop-up
Green Collective Eatery, 2158 West 32nd Avenue, Unit 100
Run, eat and drink for a good cause with bRUNch Running. A buck from each $15 ticket sold will go to Girls on the Run Rockies; that ticket also includes a post-run Gruvi mimosa, a swag bag and 10 percent off brunch at the Green Collective. There are five start times, beginning at 6:30 a.m., and you can choose from an 8-mile or 5k route. bRUNch Running has a similar event planned for July 25 at Syrup at Edgewater Public Market.
Buy tickets: Eventbrite

Sunday, July 11

Taste Italian street-food All-Star game specials
Panzano, 909 17th Street
This longtime downtown staple for Italian is changing things up a bit for the All-Star game, with a menu of Italian street-food specials available July 10-13 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Panzano lounge. Options include a Calabrian fried chicken sandwich, polenta fries, a pork and fennel sausage “burger” and more, all available on a walk-in basis only.
For more info: Visit panzano-denver.com

Monday, July 12

Hear Michael Pollan discuss his new book, This Is Your Mind on Plants
Online

Boulder Book Store is hosting this Zoom chat with the author of The Omnivore’s Dilemma; his new book takes a deep dive into three plant-based drugs: opium, caffeine and mescaline. Tickets start at $28, and the first 245 people to register will get a signed bookplate.
For tickets: Visit Eventbrite

Keep reading for future food and drink events:

Thursday, July 15

Hear from chefs doing food justice right
Space Gallery Annex, 95 South Cherokee Street
Beloved Denver chefs Dana Rodriguez (Work & Class, Super Mega Bien), Jeff Osaka (Osaka Ramen, Sushi-Rama), Paul C. Reilly (Coperta), Letisha Steele and Carrie Shores (both of SAME Cafe) join forces in a documentary series on why food justice matters to them. The SAME Table, $60, benefits nonprofit restaurant SAME Cafe and includes food, beer, wine and the premiere of the documentary from 5 to 8 p.m.
To snag tickets: Visit the SAME Cafe website.

Colfax Avenue: now known for sex workers and food.EXPAND

Colfax Avenue: now known for sex workers and food.

Danielle Lirette

Tuesday, July 20

Commence a Colfax culinary crawl
East Colfax Avenue between St. Paul Street and Colorado Boulevard
Tasty Colfax returns after a year’s sabbatical thanks to COVID, with free bites and drink specials from numerous eateries (and drinkeries!) lining Denver’s longest, wickedest street from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Bands and artists will be performing along the route. Tickets, $25, always sell out.
To get tickets and info: Visit the Tasty Colfax website.

Wednesday, July 21

Feast on hoagies and spumoni choco tacos at a pop-up
Right Cream, 3047 Larimer Street, #101
Bar Dough sous chef A.J. Schreffler was behind Jabroni & Sons, the popular pandemic hoagie pop-up. Now, under the name Little Arthur’s, he’s teaming up with another pandemic food success story, Right Cream, for a one-day-only pop-up with South Philly-style Italian hoagies and spumoni choco tacos. Right Cream alone sells out super quickly online, so set an alarm for your best shot at getting a pre-order in. Pick-up will be available from 4 to 9 p.m.
To secure your grub: Pre-orders go on sale at 10 a.m. on July 9 on Right Cream’s website.

Forget Taco Tuesday; enjoy a taco takeover
Pizzeria Locale, 1730 Pearl Street, Boulder
Chef Jose Avila (of the brand-new La Diabla and cult favorite El Borrego Negro) is taking his show on the road to el norte. Reservations for tacos, margs and pre-Hispanic Mayan cuisine are open now — and going fast.
Secure your spot: Visit Tock to make reservations.

Go to a farm dinner for a good cause
Black Cat Farm, 9889 North 51st Street, Longmont
Sophie’s Neighborhood is a nonprofit dedicated to raising funds for research of rare childhood diseases, started by Boulder chef Hosea Rosenberg and his wife, Lauren Feder, following their daughter Sophie’s diagnosis of a condition that affects only thirty people in the world. Every dinner from this summer’s Supper Club series will benefit Sophie’s Neighborhood, and the July 21 event will feature food from Rosenberg and chef Tajahi Cooke at one 7 p.m. seating for $275 per person.
To buy tickets: Visit firesideatfive.com/supperclub

Unlike 2016's Big Eat, this year's version won't be downtown. But no matter where it's held, this won't be an uncommon sight.EXPAND

Unlike 2016’s Big Eat, this year’s version won’t be downtown. But no matter where it’s held, this won’t be an uncommon sight.

Danielle Lirette

Thursday, July 22

Eat big at the Big Eat
Various Denver locations
The summer food festival returns after a year of not much to celebrate. Instead of the traditional setup (with everyone gathering under the glass at the Denver Center for the Performing Arts Galleria), eateries across Denver will be hosting ticketed events (like cocktail classes and a lamb cookout) and donating a portion of sales to hospitality advocacy group EatDenver. Early participants include Santo, Cart-Driver LoHi, the Bindery and Avanti Food & Beverage (both Denver and Boulder locations).
To keep up with the news: Visit EatDenver’s website.

Saturday, July 24

Binge on bubbly (not that kind) at a beer festival
Mile High Station, 2027 West Colfax Avenue
Beer fests are back, baby! Choose from one of two sessions of the Summer Brew Fest: 1 to 4 p.m. or 7 to 10 p.m. There’s also an evening VIP ticket that gets you in the doors at 6 p.m. Do we need to explain how this works? Nah, it’s Colorado. We’re all experts. Tickets range from $40 to $55.
For details: Visit Summer Brew Fest’s website.

Grilled carrots and peas at Annette, which is serving a James Beard Foundation dinner in July.EXPAND

Grilled carrots and peas at Annette, which is serving a James Beard Foundation dinner in July.

Danielle Lirette

Sunday, July 25

Shell out the big bucks for a Beard-worthy blowout
Annette, 2501 Dallas Street, Aurora
James Beard Award nominee chef Caroline Glover is turning out a three-course meal with wine and whiskey pairings. Seatings are at 5 and 7:45 p.m. and are available for tables of two, four or six diners ($240 to $720).
For menu details and tickets: Take a look at the James Beard Foundation website.

Saturday, July 31

Go whole hog (and cow and chicken and fish) at Heritage Fire
Snowmass Base Village, 84 Carriage Way, Snowmass Village
Cochon555’s Heritage Fire returns to the mountain with an evening of everything from fish to fowl to bovine to Berkshires being cooked over open-air fires along with free-flowing wine, beer and cocktails. Tier one tickets have sold out, but tier two tickets are available through July 15 for $110 for general admission and $175 for VIP early entry.
For more info: Visit the event website.

Monday, August 2

Enjoy a dinner from famed chef Marc Vetri

Tavernetta, 1889 16th Street
The chef behind Philadelphia’s Vetri Cucina will be in Denver for one night only serving up a special four-course menu in collaboration with the Tavernetta team. The 8:15 p.m. seating is already sold out, but you can still book for 5 p.m. for $150 per person.
For reservations: Book on Tock

The Cherry Cricket will be defending its 2019 best burger title at this year's Burger Battle.EXPAND

The Cherry Cricket will be defending its 2019 best burger title at this year’s Burger Battle.

Courtesy of the Cherry Cricket

Thursday, August 5

Go to war for your faves at the Denver Burger Battle
Tivoli Quad, 1000 Larimer Street
The Cherry Cricket is returning to defend its 2019 Judge’s Choice title, as well as past winners Stanley Beer Hall (2018 and 2017), Stoic & Genuine (2016) and eight more contenders hungry for glory and ground beef. See if your tastes line up with those of Westword Food & Drink editor Molly Martin, who will be there as a judge. Tickets, $79 to $144, include bottomless burgers and booze. GA entry begins at 6:30 p.m.
For details and tickets: Take a look at the Denver Burger Battle website.

Sunday, August 8

Dine at a Greek-inspired dinner from one of Denver’s top restaurants
Restaurant Olivia, 290 South Downing Street
The entire team from Italian eatery Olivia are traveling in Greece and, upon their return, will be cooking up a Mediterranean wine dinner inspired by their experiences. The July 25 event sold out quickly, but there are still a handful of spots available for the August 8 dinner.
To book: Visit Tock; reservations require a $25 deposit

Thursday, August 12

Treat yourself to a boozy weekend in the mountains
Vail Athletic Fields, 646 Vail Valley Drive, Vail
This year’s Vail Wine Classic includes wine dinners, seminars and boozy brunch, plus a pair of two-hour grand tastings at 1:30 and 5 p.m. on Friday and Saturday. Tickets for the grand tastings are $99 to $225.
For more info: Visit the event website and get tickets on Eventbrite.

Know of an event that belongs on this calendar? Send information to [email protected].

Keep Westword Free… Since we started Westword, it has been defined as the free, independent voice of Denver, and we would like to keep it that way. Offering our readers free access to incisive coverage of local news, food and culture. Producing stories on everything from political scandals to the hottest new bands, with gutsy reporting, stylish writing, and staffers who’ve won everything from the Society of Professional Journalists’ Sigma Delta Chi feature-writing award to the Casey Medal for Meritorious Journalism. But with local journalism’s existence under siege and advertising revenue setbacks having a larger impact, it is important now more than ever for us to rally support behind funding our local journalism. You can help by participating in our “I Support” membership program, allowing us to keep covering Denver with no paywalls.



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No relief from Wisconsin’s 565 percent payday loan interest under new rules

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No relief from Wisconsin’s 565 percent payday loan interest under new rules

Reading Time: 7 minutes

In 2014, hunger drove Michelle Warne of Green Bay to take out a loan from a local Check ‘n Go. “I had no food in the house at all,” she said. “I just couldn’t take any more.”

Over the next two years, the retiree paid off that loan. But she took out a second loan, which she has not paid off completely. That led to more borrowing earlier this year — $401 — plus $338 to pay off the outstanding balance. According to her truth-in-lending statement, paying off this $740 will cost Warne $983 in interest and fees over 18 months.

Warne’s annual interest rate on her so-called installment loan was 143 percent. That is a relatively low rate compared to payday loans, or small amounts of money borrowed at high interest rates for 90 days or less.

In 2015, the average annual interest rate on payday loans in Wisconsin was nearly four times as high: 565 percent, according the state Department of Financial Institutions. A consumer borrowing $400 at that rate would pay $556 in interest alone over about three months. There could also be additional fees.

Wisconsin is one of just eight states that has no cap on annual interest for payday loans; the others are Nevada, Utah, Delaware, Ohio, Idaho, South Dakota and Texas. Payday loan reforms proposed last week by the federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau would not affect maximum interest rates, which can be set by states but not the CFPB, the federal agency that focuses on ensuring fairness in borrowing for consumers.

“We need better laws,” said Warne, 73. “Because when they have something like this, they will take advantage of anybody who is poor.”

The truth-in-lending box on Michelle Warne’s loan explains how much she owes. With principal, interest and fees, the $740 loan will cost her $1,723. “I wish I would have read the fine print,” she said. Credit: Bridgit Bowden / Wisconsin Public Radio

Warne never applied for a standard personal loan, even though some banks and credit unions offer them at a fraction of the interest rate she paid. She was positive a bank would not lend to her, she said, because her only income is her Social Security retirement.

“They wouldn’t give me a loan,” Warne said. “Nobody would.”

According to the DFI annual reports, there were 255,177 payday loans made in the state in 2011. Since then, the numbers have steadily declined: In 2015, just 93,740 loans were made.

A customer enters the PL$ Payday Loan Store on Red Arrow Trail in Madison. In 2015, the average annual interest rate on payday loans in Wisconsin was 565 percent. Credit: Mike DeVries / The Cap Times

But numbers after 2011 likely understate the volume of short-term, high-interest borrowing. That is because of a change in the state payday lending law that means fewer such loans are being reported to the state, former DFI Secretary Peter Bildsten said.

Questionable reporting

In 2011, Republican state legislators and Gov. Scott Walker changed the definition of payday loan to include only those made for 90 days or less. High-interest loans for 91 days or more — often called installment loans — are not subject to state payday loan laws.

Because of that loophole, Bildsten said, “The data that we have to gather at DFI and then report on an annual basis to the Legislature is almost inconsequential.”

State Rep. Gordon Hintz, D-Oshkosh, agreed. The annual DFI report, he said, “is severely underestimating the loan volume.”

State Rep. Gordon Hintz, D-Oshkosh, said under new proposed federal rules tightening regulation on short-term loans, he expects to see “more products morph into more dangerous, more high-cost, long-term loans.” Credit: Office of Rep. Gordon Hintz

Hintz, a member of the Assembly’s Finance Committee, said it is likely many borrowers are actually taking out installment loans that are not reported to the state. Payday lenders can offer both short-term payday loans and longer-term borrowing that also may carry high interest and fees.

“If you go to a payday loan store, there’s a sign in the window that says ‘payday loan,’ ” Hintz said. “But the reality is, if you need more than $200 or $250, they’re going to steer you to what really is an installment loan.”

There are probably “thousands” of high-interest installment loans that are being issued but not reported, said Stacia Conneely, a consumer lawyer with Legal Action of Wisconsin, which provides free legal services to low-income individuals. The lack of reporting, she said, creates a problem for policymakers.

A large country house with its own salmon fishing stretch for the price of a terraced house in London

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Situated on 10 acres of beautiful land including a third of a mile from the River Nairn, Cantray House is a magnificent Neo-Palladian house with six bedrooms.

There is good sea trout and salmon on the third of a mile of the Nairn River in Cantray House’s nearly 10 acres of land.

A road winds slowly through the park, passing mature trees, rhododendrons, azaleas, stables, a large greenhouse and other outbuildings, before approaching the 1920s Scottish New Palladian house in Croy, near ‘Inverness, which is on sale via Strutt & Parker at an asking price of £ 1.35million. Just for comparison, it’s basically the same as this house in Kentish Town.

Agents describe Cantray’s 7,825 square foot interiors as Scottish / French style. The ground floor has a large modern kitchen, living room, dining room, morning room as well as a pantry, weapons room and wine store.

Upstairs, five bedrooms, two of which are en suite, plus a dressing room. The top floor houses a large games room and a small apartment with a kitchen area, a living room and an en-suite bedroom.

Close to the village of Cawdor, with its famous castle, and a multitude of golf courses, Cantray House is four miles from the site of the Battle of Culloden, where its then heiress, Bonnie James Dallas, fell.

Cantray House

Cantray House is for sale for £ 1.35million via Strutt & Parker – see more photos or inquire with agent for details.

Croy: What you need to know

  • Site: Croy is located six minutes from Cawdor and its castle, 12 from Nairn and 20 from Inverness
  • Things to do: The area is ideal for walking and cycling, as well as for delving into Highland history at Cawdor Castle and Culloden Battlefield. There are beaches and a marina in Nairn, which also offers a sports center, tennis club, swimming pool, equestrian center, cricket ground and two championship golf courses. The great links courses can be found at the Castle Stuart Golf Club and the Royal Dornoch. There is salmon fishing on the Nairn, Findhorn and Spey rivers and shooting on local estates.
  • Schools: Croy has his own primary school as does Cawdor nearby
    Find more properties in the area.

We take a look at the finest country houses, castles and estates for sale in Scotland, from a stunning refurbishment


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A vegan barbecue landed in the Denver subway

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Vegan dishes at JackBeQue. Photo by Karen Williams

Eat and drink

Three-day smoked jackfruit, daikon radish bacon, and dairy-free green chili mac bites are on the menu at JackBeQue in Englewood.


South Denver has a new destination for vegan comfort food, thanks to the arrival of JackBeQue. The take-out or delivery-only outlet, which opened inside the Hilton Denver Inverness in February, is the brainchild of Atlanta-born Ross Pullen.

Pullen, who studied sustainability in college before attending Colorado Mountain College Culinary School in Summit County, switched to a vegan diet four years ago with the help of a 10-hour fast. days. This experience opened his eyes to the daily overconsumption of individuals and inspired him to open a southern-style vegan barbecue restaurant. “There’s so much room to create healthier options for Southern cuisine, but I’ve seen a shortage of it in the Denver area,” Pullen says.

At JackBeQue, Pullen offers dishes produced with whole ingredients like organic bread, daikon radish and hemp seeds, then garnishes them with homemade dishes and of local origin vegan sauces. As the name suggests, one of the highlights of the menu is smoked jackfruit, a tropical fruit native to southern India. When the product is cooked and grated, it looks remarkably like pulled pork, making it a common ingredient in vegan barbecues. In fact, the striking resemblance often deceives even diners. “I had a vegetarian guest at a catering event a few weeks ago who almost didn’t eat barbecue because she didn’t believe it wasn’t meat,” Pullen laughs.

Making JackBeQue’s signature smoked jackfruit requires a long process. First, Pullen mixes the jackfruit with some of his tangy and slightly sweet homemade barbecue sauce. Then it passes through the smokehouse for three days before it’s ready to be served in one of Pullen’s sandwiches, like the JackBeQban, made with barbecue jackfruit topped with vegan ‘cheese’, smoked watermelon, pickles and mustard. from Dijon.

Another must-have menu item is Pullen’s bacon, which is made with marinated and smoked daikon radish, which makes a crisp, flavorful accompaniment to dishes like brandy-braised Brussels sprouts and hearty BeanBePatty Melt. “I prefer whole plant-based ingredients and avoid soy, so I started working with daikon radish to see what I could create,” says Pullen.

JackBeQue only uses natural ingredients, such as non-GMO rice bran oil for frying. Pullen’s commitment to using whole foods is linked to his passion for a sustainable lifestyle. For example, after learning that much of the deforestation in the Amazon rainforest is caused by a demand to grow soybeans, Pullen wanted to remove soybeans from his diet.

Crispy favorites to try include the fried green chili macaroni, bites that are crispy on the outside, creamy on the inside and served with a homemade barbecue sauce. Or order hush puppies, one of Pullen’s favorite foods growing up. Its variation is accompanied by a side dish of vegan maple butter (instead of the traditional honey butter), which complements the sweet spice of the chipotle seasoning.

Fancy some dessert? Finish your meal with the Peach Blueberry Cobbler, served with a creamy homemade hemp ice cream.

After only a few months of activity, JackBeQue is already expanding its schedules and offers. Stop by on the weekends to try their new brunch menu, featuring Belgian-style mac and cheese waffles, homemade potatoes and, of course, a healthy side of daikon bacon.

JackBeQue is open for take-out and delivery inside the Hilton Denver Inverness, Thursday through Friday, 11 am to 8 pm and Saturday through Sunday, 9 am to 8 pm; diners can also order via Uber Eats, Doordash or Grubhub; 200 Inverness Dr. W., Englewood


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Keep Calm and carry on! Buckingham Palace hosts first Changing of the Guard in 17 months

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Tourists watch British soldiers

CARL DE SOUZA / AFP / Getty Changing of the guard

Buckingham Palace hosted its first Changing of the Guard since COVID-19 forced the historic London event to be suspended in March 2020.

On Monday, soldiers from the 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards donned their famous scarlet tunics and bearskin hats outside queen elizabethin London to participate in the ceremony for the first time in just over 17 months.

Alongside them, the group of Coldstream Guards performed a series of songs in honor of the British Olympic team, including the success of the Spandau Ballet in 1983. Gold, Whitney Houston A moment in time, and The Olympic theme Oscar winner Chariots of fire.

Tourists watch British soldiers

Tourists watch British soldiers

CARL DE SOUZA / AFP / Getty Changing of the guard

The famous palace ceremony was interrupted last year along with those at Windsor Castle, the Tower of London and St. James’s Palace as part of the British government’s drive to avoid large public gatherings and slow down traffic. spread of the coronavirus.

While the guards continued to occupy their sentry posts outside Buckingham Palace, it was in an “administrative guard” where they changed staff without ceremony or music of any kind.

After Monday’s ceremony, however, the full ceremony will now take place at Buckingham Palace, St. James’s Palace and the Tower of London on Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays and Sundays.

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Changing of the guard

Changing of the guard

Andrew Matthews / PA Images via Getty Changing of the Guard at Windsor Castle

The palace ceremony follows on the heels of the First post-containment Changing of the guard at Windsor Castle in July, which saw the 1st Battalion of the Grenadier Guards return to the cobbled streets of Queen Elizabeth’s private home, where she isolated herself for most of the pandemic with her late husband, Prince Philippe.

In July, prince charles and Camille, Duchess of Cornwall also invited the group of Coldstream Guards to play the English football anthems “Three Lions” and “Sweet Caroline” in the garden of Clarence House to celebrate the England football team’s success at the Euro 2020 Championships .

Unfortunately for England fans – including Prince william, Kate Middleton and Prince george, who attended EURO 2020 matches at Wembley Stadium in London – the team were ultimately beaten by Italy in the final match.


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Albyn Housing workers consider strike in pay and terms row

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GMB Scotland organizer John McCartney said: “As the staff survey shows, the 1% pay increase is not acceptable.”

Some staff of a major housing association threaten to take industrial action if an offer of wages and conditions is not improved.

Any strike action by Albyn Housing Society employees could impact residents of the strath.

It is the largest social housing lessor in the region with the local authority and has more than 3,300 housing units in the Highlands.

The GMB move was triggered after staff grew angry at a new offer of just 1% pay hike.

However, many others were also angry that there was no recognition of the additional costs associated with working from home.

GMB staff were surveyed and 89 percent felt that one percent was not enough while 100 percent said they should be offered compensation for working from home.

Today, 79 percent said they “are now ready to take industrial action because of the serious discontent they feel.”

GMB Scotland organizer John McCartney said: “As the staff survey shows, the 1% pay rise is not acceptable, the numbers speak for themselves.

“An even more sensitive area is the lack of recognition of the increased costs of working from home.

“Staff were unanimous in saying that there should be compensation for heating their homes, using electricity and the like – all of which have become a burden on the households that work for Albyn.

“The GMB, as a union, is always happy to come back to the negotiating table to resolve this issue, but if Albyn does not want to negotiate seriously and in good faith to find a solution, industrial action is a very good option. real.

“It’s a situation that can be resolved and that’s what we hope we can do, but Albyn needs to take it seriously first. “

But the call to resume negotiations to find a solution comes as Albyn’s chief executive Lisa Buchanan and chairman Maxine Smith have resigned.

Kirsty Morrison, the current Director of Client Services, has been appointed Interim General Manager.

Mr McCartney said the changes added to concerns.

“This is yet another disruption of the daily work goals of staff and adds to the high turnover of staff over the past 18 months,” he said. “This high staff turnover is alarming for such a reputable organization and will undoubtedly be of concern to GMB members. “

Ms Smith, who is also a Highlands Councilor, said: “I have been happy to have served on the Albyn board for 17 years. I took over the presidency two years ago, but it takes a tremendous amount of time.

“I’m trying to free up time to develop my own businesses, so I made the decision to devote more than enough of my time to the social housing sector.

“It gives me time to focus on my own work as well as my work as a board constituent, which I still love.

“I also need personal time because I am not getting any younger.”

A spokeswoman for Albyn Housing, which has bases in Inverness and Invergordon, said: “While we are not commenting on individual resignations, I would like to point out that Kirsty Morrison has been appointed interim CEO.

“Recruitment for the positions of Managing Director and President is already underway.

“I am concerned that we are not providing any comment to the media on the negotiations. We communicate on these issues with the employees and with the union because some employees are members. “


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Loan review: Dan Adshead debuts at Gillingham – News

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Loaned Norwich City player Dan Adshead made his first start for Gillingham in front of a home crowd in a 2-1 win over Morecambe on Saturday.

The midfielder’s debut came just two days after making the one-season transfer to the Gills, playing 51 minutes before being substituted.

Somewhere else, Sebastien soto scored his first goal in his third appearance for Porto B. The forward found the back of the net for Porto’s only goal before coming out in the 70e minute in the Portuguese 1-1 draw against Nacional.

Josip drmic continued his form as a goalscorer in Croatia, entering the 52sd minute and scoring a penalty just 12 minutes later. The shot on goal was the forward’s fourth goal in four league games for the team, also making him the top scorer in the 1. HNL.

Back in the Football League, Akin Famewo scored 180 minutes during the week as he played a 2-1 loss to MK Dons and a 2-0 loss to Wigan Athletic. Josh martin was an unused substitute against the Addicks for the Dons but came on for 20 minutes against Ipswich Town at the weekend.

Meanwhile, the attacker Gassan Ahadme got 135 minutes in the tank as a halftime substitute against Shrewsbury Town and played all 90 minutes in a 0-0 draw against Doncaster Rovers.

On the way to Iceland, Isak Thorvaldsson played the 90 minutes of IA Akranes’ 2-1 loss to Breiðablik on Wednesday.

FA Cup first round action has started for Sam blair and Bury Town on Saturday, the young keeper keeping his clean sheet in his 1-0 win to advance to the second round.

In the North National League, Matthew Denis made a cameo appearance for Southend United in their 1-0 victory over King’s Lynn Town, with the forward entering the 79e minute.

Players who were unused substitutes: Daniel Barden (Livingston), Reece McAlear (Inverness Caledonian Thistle) Danel Sinani (Huddersfield Town) Tyrese Omotoye (Leyton Orient)

Players who have not been involved in the match day squads: Sam McCallum (Queens Park Rangers)

Role reversal is good for Robbie Deas as Caley Thistle ruled out remaining league rivals

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Role reversal is good for Robbie Deas as Caley Thistle ruled out remaining league rivals


































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Meet the women who will represent Team USA in Inverness

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After a week filled with drama at Carnoustie, nothing has changed regarding Team USA’s automatic qualifying list for the 2021 Solheim Cup.

Megan Khang retained the seventh and final spot on the US Solheim Cup points list. And Lizette Salas, who finished second at the AIG Women’s British Open, maintained her position to advance to the Rolex rankings in 14th place with rookie Jennifer Kupcho (No.28).

Brittany Altomare finished tied for eighth on the points list with Salas, 33.5 points behind Khang. Mina Harigae finished 34 points behind Khang.

Yealimi Noh narrowly missed qualifying out of the standings, falling to 31st in the world.

Captain Pat Hurst used his three captain’s picks on Altomare, Harigae and Noh.

“The last two years have been so long and I’m so happy to finally know who will be on the American squad at Toledo,” said Hurst. “This is an incredibly talented group of players, with such crucial experience to draw on as we work to win back the Cup. I am delighted to have the opportunity to lead this team and look forward to finally arrive in Inverness.


Europe team: Meet Team Europe for the Solheim Cup 2021


Here’s a look at the United States squad.

Nelly Korda won the gold medal at the Tokyo 2020 Summer Olympics at Kasumigaseki Country Club. Photo by Michael Madrid-USA TODAY Sports

Age: 23
Hometown: Bradenton, Florida
How she qualified: List of Solheim points
Solheim Cup appearances: 2019
Career review of the Solheim Cup: 3-0-1

US Captain Juli Inkster laughs with Danielle Kang at Des Moines Golf and Country Club. (Photo by Brian Spurlock-USA TODAY Sports)

Age: 28
Hometown: Las Vegas
How she qualified: List of Solheim points
Solheim Cup appearances: 2017, 2019
Career review of the Solheim Cup: 4-4-0

Ally Ewing walks to the 18th green during ANA Inspiration 2021 at Mission Hills Country Club in Rancho Mirage, Calif. (Photo by Desert Sun)

Age: 28
Hometown: Fulton, Mississippi
How she qualified: List of Solheim points
Solheim Cup appearances: 2019
Career review of the Solheim Cup: 1-3-0

REGINA, CANADA - AUGUST 25: Austin Ernst of America descends the 2nd fairway during the third round of the CP Women's Open at Wascana Country Club on August 25, 2018 in Regina, Canada.  (Photo by Vaughn Ridley / Getty Images)

Austin Ernst walks the 2nd fairway in Round 3 of the 2018 CP Women’s Open in Regina, Canada. (Photo: Vaughn Ridley / Getty Images)

Age: 29
Hometown: Seneca, South Carolina
How she qualified: List of Solheim points
Solheim Cup appearances: 2017
Career review of the Solheim Cup: 2-2-0

Lexi thompson

Lexi Thompson at the LPGA Mediheal Championship at the Lake Merced Golf Club in Daly City, California. (Photo: Kyle Terada-USA TODAY Sports)

Age: 26
Hometown: Coral Springs, Florida
How she qualified: List of Solheim points
Solheim Cup appearances: 2013, 2015, 2017, 2019
Career review of the Solheim Cup: 5-4-6

Olympic Games: Golf-Women

Jessica Korda at the Tokyo 2020 Summer Olympics at Kasumigaseki Country Club. (Photo by Michael Madrid-USA TODAY Sports)

Age: 28
Hometown: Jupiter, Florida
How she qualified: List of Solheim points
Solheim Cup appearances: 2013, 2019
Career review of the Solheim Cup: 4-2-2

Megan Khang during the Solheim Cup 2019 in Gleneagles, Scotland. (Photo: Jamie Squire / Getty Images)

Age: 23
Hometown: Rockland, Massachusetts
How she qualified: List of Solheim points
Solheim Cup appearances: 2019
Career review of the Solheim Cup: 0-2-1

Lizette Salas at the Solheim Cup 2019 at the Gleneagles Hotel in Scotland. (Photo by Andy Buchanan / AFP / Getty Images)

Age: 32
Hometown: Azusa, California
How she qualified: Rolex Rankings
Solheim Cup appearances: 2013, 2015, 2017, 2019
Career review of the Solheim Cup: 6-6-2

Jennifer Kupcho at the 2021 Drive On LPGA Championship at Golden Ocala Golf Club in Ocala, Florida. Photo by Michael Reaves / Getty Images

Age: 24
Hometown: Westminster, Colorado
How she qualified: Rolex Rankings
Solheim Cup appearances: Beginner

AIG Women's British Open

Yealimi Noh at the 2021 AIG Women’s British Open in Carnoustie, Scotland. (Photo: Scott Heppell / Associated Press)

Age: 20
How she qualified: The captain’s choice
Solheim Cup appearances: Beginner

AIG Women's British Open

Mina Harigae of the United States on 15th tee in the first round of the 2021 AIG Women’s Open in Carnoustie. (Photo: Andrew Redington / Getty Images)

Age: 31
Hometown: Monterey, California
How she qualified: The captain’s choice
Solheim Cup appearances: Beginner

LOTTE tomare LPGA Championship

Brittany Altomare overlooks the ninth green during the first round of the LPGA LOTTE Championship at Kapolei Golf Club on April 14, 2021 in Kapolei, Hawaii. (Photo: Christian Petersen / Getty Images)

Age: 30
Hometown: Worcester, Massachusetts
How she qualified: The captain’s choice
Solheim Cup appearances: 2019
Career review of the Solheim Cup: 2-1-1


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